Cretaceous Non-Marine Faunas of Northwestern North America.
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Cretaceous Non-Marine Faunas of Northwestern North America.

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Published by s.n in S.l .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

1

SeriesRoyal Ontario Museum Life Sciences Contribution -- 61
ContributionsRussell, Loris S.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21803577M

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Cretaceous non-marine faunas of northwestern North America / Pages; Cretaceous non-marine faunas of northwestern North America / By. Russell, Loris Shano, Royal Ontario Museum. If you are generating a PDF of a journal article or book chapter, please feel Cited by: Cretaceous non-marine faunas of northwestern North America Item Preview Cretaceous non-marine faunas of northwestern North America by Russell, Loris Shano, ; Royal Ontario Museum. Publication date This book is available with additional data at Biodiversity Heritage Library. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE LOWER CRETA- CEOUS FORMATIONS AND FAUNAS OF THE UNITED STATES., INTRODUCTION. BESIDES the facts of wide distribution and economic impor- tance the Cretaceous is notable for the problems of more purely scientific nature than it . Benjamin Sames: Early Cretaceous Cypridea Bosquet in North America and Europe It was not until the late s–early s that this kind of work was : Benjamin Sames.

Recent studies (e.g., Winkler et al., ; Archibald, ; Eaton et al., ) have suggested relationships between eustasy during specific intervals within the Cretaceous and early Tertiary (Albian-Aptian, Cenomanian-Turonian, Maastrichtian-Tertiary, respectively) and the evolution of vertebrate tions based on the studies of relatively narrow time intervals (4 million years or Cited by: 3. In: Michael O. Woodburne, Editors. Mammalian faunal succession in the Cretaceous System of western North America. Article. Cretaceous non-marine faunas of northwestern North America. Highlights We present the first study on the ichnofauna of the Wapiti Formation, west-central Alberta. The Late Cretaceous Wapiti Formation is representative of exclusively non-marine taxa. Seven morphotypes are recognized and attributed to mammals, small reptiles, amphibians, and dinosaurs. This study provides additional data on high-latitude faunas from western North America in the by: Many of the taxa of Late Cretaceous dinosaurs in North America are strikingly related to forms found in Asia, lending support to a northern migration route between northeast Asia and northwest North America (e.g., Russell, ; Pasch and May, ; Currie, ; Norman and Sues, ; Sereno, ; Godefroit et al., ). Various models have.

Late Maastrichtian paleoenvironments and dinosaur biogeography in the western interior of North America. Palaeogeogr., Palaeoclimatol., Palaeoecol., During Late Maastrichtian time, three major sedimentary depositional provinces existed in continental environments of the western interior region of North by: Dinosaur Provincial Park (DPP) was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in , but in the exceptional quality and abundance of dinosaur fossils were already recognized with 80 km 2 of the richest fossil beds being set aside as an Alberta, Canada, provincial park. DPP represents possibly the best window into the biology of the Late Campanian anywhere in the world. Russell LS. Cretaceous non-marine faunas of northwestern North America. Life Sciences Contributions, Royal Ontario Museum. ; 1– Ryan M, Tanke D, Brinkman D, Eberth D, Currie P. A new Pachyrhinosaurus-like ceratopsian from the upper Dinosaur Park Formation (late Campanian) of southern Alberta, Canada. INTRODUCTION. The fossil record of latest Cretaceous mammals from North America (Lancian land-mammal ‘age,’ NALMA) consists mostly of isolated teeth and fragmentary jaws; nevertheless, it includes more specimens and localities from this interval than any other major landmass (Kielan-Jaworowska et al., ).As such, it serves as a primary source of paleontological data for analyzing Cited by: